Blog
  • http://i2.wp.com/blog.bandg.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/Will-Oxley.jpg?resize=600%2C400
  • http://i0.wp.com/blog.bandg.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/Andrew-Cape.jpg?resize=600%2C400
  • http://i2.wp.com/blog.bandg.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/Jean-Luc-Nelias.jpg?resize=600%2C400

The B&G Navigators’ Prize for the Volvo Ocean Race 2014-15 – Leg Four

Blog

 

The B&G Navigators Prize for the Volvo Ocean Race 2014-15 Prize is presented to the Navigator who has made the most effective use of meteorological, oceanographic and geographical information to gain distance on the majority of the fleet, as voted for by the Navigators themselves.

Each of the Navigators competing in the race has been asked to score his or her fellow navigators from one to six points during each leg, with Lorient to Gothenburg counting as one leg.

The Navigator with the highest points score at the of each leg will win a cash prize of $1000. The Navigator with the highest cumulative points score at the end of the race will win $5000. The Navigators are not allowed to vote for themselves.

The B&G Navigators Prize for the Volvo Ocean Race 2014-15 is, if you like, the prize for the ’Navigators’ Navigator’.

Through the course of this week B&G will feature comment and content from the Navigators from the competing teams, in answer to the questions we asked as Leg Four unfolded. They were also asked to provide their scores for the B&G Navigators’ Prize for Leg Four, and the winner will be revealed later in the week.

Today we have feedback from Will Oxley of Team Alvimedica, Andrew Cape of Team Brunel and from Jean Luc Nelias of MAPFRE, the winner of Leg Four.

Team Alvimedica – Will Oxley

Volvo Ocean Race 2014-15 - Leg 4 to Auckland

B&G: What was your best decision for this leg so far, and was it made with information available pre-start or data  you obtained during the leg?

WO: Nice curve out to the east allowing us to get east of Vanuatu with a good heading south to NZ. Of course the rest of the fleet had the same idea but it was still a good one and a lot of effort expended by all boats to get that far east before heading south.

Our track south from Vanuatu was a good one,  making the best use of each sail within its range. Plenty of sail changes.

B&G: What decisions would you have made differently?

WO: Very early on in the leg we should have gone west of the Islands near Sanya but we chose to stay with the majority of the fleet and this was a good gain to Team SCA. We tightened up the on board communications again after this.

We spent a bit much time on the wrong sail a couple of times and our boat speed suffered. However it may have helped our positioning so hard to say at this stage what we would have done differently, other than the obvious of being a bit further east and south on the trough. We would then have poked out earlier into the good breeze.

B&G: Did you change your plans significantly during the leg based on the actions of your competitors?

Our routing showed a similar path north to that chosen by Team SCA and Brunel. In the absence of other yachts we would have tacked north west of the Luzon Strait but east of where those two boats went north. As it was we decided to stick with the pack when no one tacked north. We decided that too many things had to go right for the Brunel strategy to work. As it turned out it might have worked had Brunel continued to stay further east rather than spending their leverage.

Other than that we have stuck to our game plan with just small course changes to protect or to try to gain against the fleet.

Team Brunel – Andrew Cape

Volvo Ocean Race 2014-15 - Leg 4 to Auckland

B&G: Was your decision to go north towards Taiwan made with information available pre-start or data you obtained during the leg?

AC: The decision was made based on weather data received whilst at sea.

B&G: Can you explain what weather features made it so successful?

AC: Wind earlier, more wind, more TWA. It was a lot more distance to travel!

MAPFRE – Jean Luc Nelias

Volvo Ocean Race 2014-15 - Leg 4 to Auckland

B&G: What was your best decision for this leg so far, and was it made with information available pre-start or data you obtained during the leg?

JLN: Our best decision was to push hard to be on windward of the fleet before crossing the latitude of Micronesia and be able to stay on windward before crossing the Doldrums around 11 south. Without the fleet broadband working at the beginning [the decision was made] with the last grib we get, with [gut] feeling and confirmed when on flat sea we were able again to download grib files.

B&G: What decisions would you have made differently?

JLN: Crossing the Luzon Straight by the North like Team SCA and Team Brunel.

B&G: Did you change your plans significantly during the leg based on the actions of your competitors?

JLN: No but small adjustments in the trajectory during the 4 days we had the issue with the communication system on board.

 

Written by B&G Team

3 Comments
  1. Hello B&G, Excellent competition. Can you make those navigators spill some of their beans? Apparently some are using grib file. Is Deckman used as well? Do they use dedicated meteorologists for the longterm predictions? What do they expect to happen during an upcoming leg and what was different from the prediction. Some seem to be influenced a lot by what the rest of the fleet is doing others seem to try to make a break and go it alone.

  2. I’m really glad they did this. I feel like it ups the integrity of the race by focusing on sailing core values.

  3. Impressive! Not everyone can do same thing. Keep up the great work. You have made a legend in the industry.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *